Physics Page

Physics at Mass Academy is an accelerated course that covers concepts such as Kinematics, Work, Energy, Momentum, Rotational Kinematics, Electricity, Magnetism, Sound, Waves, and Simple Harmonic Motion. Students are able to learn advanced problem-solving skills by tackling questions where several physics concepts are involved at once.

This was the first Uber Problem of the year where a mass is launched into the air by a rocket at an angle and over level ground. The rocket burns for a specific amount of time, and while it is burning, it travels in a straight line. When the rocket's engines stop, the rocket and mass continue in projectile motion. Once the rocket falls a certain distance from its maximum height, a parachute opens. The parachute changes the rocket's speed, and the rocket continues to descend at this new constant vertical velocity. An East to West wind blows on the rocket as the parachute descends. Each student at MAMS was given a different value for each starting variable. For example, I was given 45 degrees as my launch angle, 8.1 seconds as my engine burn time, 6.5 meters per second squared as my engine acceleration, 77 meters from the max height as the location of the parachute's deployment, nine meters per second as the vertical velocity with the parachute, and 20 meters per second as the horizontal velocity with the parachute. The goal of this problem was to find the total displacement of the rocket in the x-direction. My overall approach to this problem was to find the x-displacement piece by piece. I found the velocities and time elapsed at each significant point of the rocket's path and used these values to find the displacement in the x-direction.

This Uber Problem combined concepts of Forces and Kinematics. The problem details that Leaping Larry places rocks on the vertical side of a pulley-ramp system, walks to point A on the ramp, and sits in a luge. Larry is accelerated to the top of the ramp and continues off of it in projectile motion, where all of his previous speed is transitioned to horizontal velocity. Larry reaches the floor and then slides to a stop due to friction. Again, each student at MAMS was given a different value for each starting variable. I was given 27 kg for the weight of Larry, 39 kg for the weight of the rocks, 30 degrees for the elevation of the ramp, 0.17 for the coefficient of friction between the luge and the ramp, 9 meters for the height of the ramp, and 74 meters for the distance from the end of the ramp to Larry's final point. The goal for this problem was to find the velocity of Larry at the top of the ramp and the coefficient of friction between the luge and the ground.