THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

   A Regional Professional Association serving  all areas of Historical Scholarship Since 1965

      SATURDAY                                                                                                                      BENTLEY COLLEGE

   APRIL 26, 2003                                                                                                          WALTHAM, MASS.

SPRING CONFERENCE PROGRAM

 

All sessions will be in Adamian Academic Center on the Bentley College campus.  Lunch will be in the LaCava Campus Center.  Room numbers will be posted at the conference.

 

8:00 - 8:30      REGISTRATION   ---   Adamian Academic Center  

 

First Morning Session, 8:30-10:00:

 

8:30   Session 1:  Cultural Implications of European Expansion, 1600-1800.

Chair and Commentator: William Hart, Middlebury College.

 

Christine Petto, Southern Connecticut State University: “Patronage, Promotion and the Geographical Process in Early

        Modern England and France.”

Roger Carpenter, SUNY Oswego: “Manitous into Men: Trade Goods and Changing Native Perceptions of Europeans

         in the Seventeenth Century.”

Jonathan Gill, Fordham University: “Uptown Downtown: Harlem and the Development of New Amsterdam.”

 

 

8:30        Session 2: :   Class, Poverty and Memory in the Early American Republic.

Chair and Commentator: Altina Waller, University of Connecticut

 

Tricia Barbagallo, University of Albany: “Poor, Destitute and Legally Entitled: The Paupers of Albany, New York,

               1785-1800.”

Robert E. Cray, Junior, Montclair State University: “Remembering the Chesapeake: Death, Class and Memory in the

            Early Republic.”

Robert Reutenauer, Trinity College: “Honest Poverty as a Crime: The Politics and Law of Imprisonment for Debt in

            Connecticut, 1821-1842.”

 

8:30     Session 3: Race, Ethnicity and Identity in America, 1850-1940.

Chair and Commentator: Julie Winch, University of Massachusetts, Boston

 

Joseph P. McKerns, Ohio State University: “The Faces of Ishmael: Racial and Ethnic Identities in 19th Century

                   Illustrated Periodicals.”

Shawn Leigh Alexander, University of Massachusetts, Amherst: “`We Must Wake Up!’ African America’s

                       Organizational Response to the Rise of Jim Crow.”

Anastasia Curwood, Princeton University: “E. Franklin Frazier and the Power of Ideals and Realities: What Makes a

          Family?”

 

 

8:30     Session 4: From Imperialism to Globalization. 1898-2000.

Chair and Commentator: Cyrus Veeser, Bentley College.

 

Keith Pomakoy, The University at Albany: “`The Good Samaritan’: American Intervention in the Cuban

                            Insurrection.”

Daniel C. Williamson, Hillyer College, University of Hartford: “It’s the Oil, Stupid: British-American Relations and

         the Anglo-Persian Agreement, 1919-1921.”

Michael Lang, University of Maine: “Globalization and the History of the `Westphalian State’.”

 


 

8:30     Session 5: Masculinity/Femininity in 20th Century American Work and Education.

Chair and Commentator:  Marilynn Johnson, Boston College

 

Anders Greenspan, Long Island University: “Men, Women and Work: Issues of Masculinity, Femininity and Work

               Inside and Outside of the Home.”

Susan L. Poulson, University of Scranton: “Individual Experience and Institutional Change: Women at Formerly

                 Men’s Colleges and Universities.”

Mary Frances Donley Forcier, Carnegie Mellon University: “Dartmouth Forever or Dartmouth Undying?: Masculinity

         and Higher Education in the Postwar Period (1945-1970).”

 

 

Break for Book Exhibit & Refreshments: 10:00-10:30

 

Morning Session II: 10:30 - 12:00

 

10:00     Session 6: Revisiting the Past: New Views on Timeless Questions in Ancient History.

Chair and Commentator: Jacqueline Carlon, Tufts University.

 

Gretchen Umholtz, Trinity College: “Democratic Values and Personal Victory in Classical Athens: Alcibiades’ Portrait

        in the the Propylaia.”

Allen Ward, University of Connecticut: “How Democratic was the Roman Republic?”

Andrew Donnelly, Tufts University: “The Nature of Constantine’s Christianity: Coins, Sculpture and the Milvian

                Bridge.”

 

10:00   Session 7: Revolution and Its Aftermath in New England

Chair and Commentator: Richard Brown, University of Connecticut.

 

John M. O’Toole, Assumption College: “Worcester Loyalists during the American Revolution.”

Robert J. Imholt, Albertus Magnus College: “Strong Flight and Homeric Fire: The Intertwined Lives of Joel Barlow

           and Timothy Dwight.”

David T. Dixon, University of Massachusetts, Boston: “The Free Black Community of Exeter, New Hampshire, 1770-

       1870.”

 

 

10:00   Session 8:   Material Culture and American Social History.

Chair: Peter Holloran, Worcester State College.

 

S.J. Wolfe, American Antiquarian Society: “Salamanders, Pigs and Bears, Oh My!   Making Sense of Iron Furnace

                Remains in the Northeast.”

Richard Koch, Hillyer College, University of Hartford: “The Curious House that Mark Built: The Mark Twain House

            in Hartford, Connecticut.”

 

 

10:00   Session 9: Repercussions of the Third Reich: Germans, Jews and Americans.

Chair and Commentator: Catherine Epstein, Amherst College

 

Francis R. Nicosia, St. Michael’s College: “Jewish Farmers in the Third Reich: Zionist Occupational Retraining

                  Centers and Nazi Jewish Policy.”

Jeffrey Diefendorf, University of New Hampshire: “Planning the `Healthy City’: From Germany to America in the

               Work of Gropius, Wagner and Neutra.”

David Monod, Wilfrid Laurier University: “Facing the Music: Denazifying Music Life in the American Zone, 1945-

            1948.”

 

10:00   Session 10: Law and Social Policy in 20th Century America.

Chair and Commentator: Clifford Putney, Bentley College.


Jill E. Martin, Quinnipiac University: “The Changing Definition of Indian Country in Federal Prohibition Laws.”

Demetra M. Pappas, Bryant College: “Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Twentieth Century Chronicle.”

 

 

 

12:00 - 1:30    Luncheon and Presidential Address

 

1:30 – 3:00: Afternoon Session

 

Session 11: Representations of the American Revolution.

Chair and Commentator: Steven C. Bullock, Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

 

David A. Rawson, Worcester State College: “Representations of the Revolution in Print: Virtue and the Virginia

               Example.”

Robert W. Smith, University of Massachusetts, Boston: “Representations of the Revolution Abroad: John Adams and

       the Problem of Etiquette.”
Karsten Fitz, University of Regensburg: “Representations of the Revolution in Memory: Competing Images,

                      Competing Narratives in the Nineteenth Century.”

 

1:30     Session 12: Social and Political Consequences of American Slavery, 1800-1865.

Chair and Commentator: Janette Greenwood, Clark University

 

Dinah Marie Mayo, University of Massachusetts at Amherst: “The St. Domingo Embargo: Jeffersonian Republicans

            and Political Counterrevolution in Massachusetts, 1800-1807.”

Alison Mann, University of New Hampshire: “Gentlemen Behaving Badly: The Sumner Assault and the Key Murder:

         Violence Committed in the Name of Honor.”

John J. Zaborney, University of Maine at Presque Isle: “Slave Hiring and White Society in Antebellum Virginia.”

Michael Pierson and Megan Williams, University of Massachusetts at Lowell: “Northern Newspapers and New

                   Orleans Unionists: A Foundation for Reconstruction?”

 

 

1:30    Session 13:  The Limits of European Imperialism in Africa and Asia, 1890-1945.

Chair and Commentator: Marylee Crofts, Bentley College.

 

Sameetah Agha, Pratt Institute: “The ‘Blackest Day’ on British India’s North-West Frontier: The Fall of the Khyber

            Pass, 1897.”

Neilash Bose, Tufts University: “Transcending Religious, National and Fragmentary History: Modern Bengali Muslim

        Intellectuals.”

Daniel Stephen, University of Colorado, Boulder: “West Africa at the British Empire Exhibition, 1924-25.”

Jeremy Rich, Cabrini College: “Libreville la Coquette: Racial Identities and Exclusionary Practices in a Small Colonial

        Town, c. 1914-45.”

          

1:30    Session 14: Notions of Gender in American History.

Chair and Commentator: Gayle V. Fischer, Salem State College.

 

Brian D. Carroll, University of Connecticut: “An Ethnohistorical Reappraisal of Native-American Masculinity

:                     Southern New England Indian Men in the English Colonial Military, 1676-1763.”

Renée N. Lansley, Ohio State University: “Gender on Campus: Coeds, In Loco Parentis, and the Paradox of

                         Femininity.”

Kara Markey, Salem State College: “The Image of Manhood Through the Homosexual Character in Early Gay

                     American Fiction.”

Jennifer Walton, Ohio State University: “Gender and the Cold War: Moral Masculinity and the 1961 Berlin Crisis.”

 

1:30    Session 15:  Humanitarianism and Religious Conflict in 19th Century Europe and the Americas.

Chair:  Virginia Brereton, Tufts University

 

William Barnhart, Caldwell College: “Contesting the `Double Union of Blood and Grace’: Transatlantic Communities

        and the American Missionary Movement During the Early Republic.”

Wayne Ackerson, Salisbury State University: “British Humanitarianism and the Caribbean: The Case of the African

            Institution and Haiti, 1807-1827.”

Rebecca Bennette, Harvard University: “The Hospital as Battlefield: Conflict in 19th Century Germany.”

 

1:30    Session 16: Teaching History and Reaching Students in the Digital Age.

Chair and Commentator: Christopher Hannan, Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

 

Christopher Mauriello, Salem State College: “Web-Based and Web-Enhanced World History.”

Brad Austin, Salem State College: “Creating an Effective Outreach Model: How to Reach the Teachers.”

Ron Smith, Massachusetts Maritime Academy: “Dynamic Presentation: Utilizing Technology and Computer Based

               Historical Simulations in History Courses.”

 

 

3:30 – 5:00:    PLENARY SESSION:

 

              A special showing of the film, “NAT TURNER: A TROUBLESOME PROPERTY.”

                                                             Directed by Charles Burnett. 

 

              Followed by a discussion with the film’s co-producer, co-writer and historian,

                                                Kenneth Greenberg of Suffolk University.

 


 

                NEHA FALL MEETING PRE-REGISTRATION

        NEHA CONFERENCE                                                    BENTLEY COLLEGE

               April 26, 2003                                                                                              Waltham, Mass.

 

NAME ....................................................................................PHONE........................................

 

AFFILIATION ............................................................  FIELD....................................................

 

MAILING ADDRESS ....................................................................................................................

 

..................................................................................................... ZIP CODE ............................

 

E-MAIL ...........................................

 


[   ]   Pre-Registration,  NEHA Members, $20.00 by mail by April 18   $...................       Please use this form to pay your 2003 dues,

[   ]   Pre-Registration, Non-Members, $25.00 by mail by April 18        $……………       even if you do not attend the meeting.

[   ]   Registration, NEHA Members,  $25.00 after April. 18                  $...................        NEHA does not bill for dues.  Membership

[   ]   Registration, Non-Members, $30 after April 18                             $…………...        expiration date is noted next to the letters

[   ]  Luncheon    $15 per person                                                             $...................        “ex” on your mailing label.  Membership is for the

       [   ]  2003 Dues    $15                                                                                         $..................                      calendar year.

       [   ]  2003 Dues   $5 (student, emeritus)                                                  $..................          Make checks payable in U. S. Funds

       [   ]  Association Fund Donation                                                                     $..................                               and RETURN BY April 18 to:

                                                                                                                                                         James P. Hanlan, NEHA Executive Secretary

                                                                          TOTAL (U.S. Funds): $……………      W. P. I.

              Please Note:  If you prefer a vegetarian luncheon, please so                                                    100 Institute Road                                                           

                indicate.  Otherwise no dietary restrictions will be assumed.                                                Worcester, MA 01609-2280


 


Please do NOT mail registrations after April 18, as they may not arrive in time.  Registration WILL BE AVAILABLE on the day of the conference.

                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

NEHA’s Fall Conference will be at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass., on October 25, 2003.

We encourage members to develop paper and/or panel proposals and mail them to Vice President Robert Imholt, History Department, Albertus Magnus College, New Haven, CT  06511-1189.

Proposals for the October meeting will be due to Prof. Imholt by July 1, 2003.

email: imholt@albertus.edu